Jai Bhim Comrade: tales of oppression and songs of resistance

by Catherine Bernier

Introduced through archival images, the revolutionary poet-singer Vilas Ghogre (see glossary) calls for workers’ rule in Bombay Our City. (see glossary) His comrades sing passionately to their brothers and sisters, hoping to bring about workers' rule so that workers will have adequate food and clothing.

Introduced through archival images, the revolutionary poet-singer Vilas Ghogre (see glossary) calls for workers’ rule in Bombay Our City. (see glossary) His comrades sing passionately to their brothers and sisters, hoping to bring about workers’ rule so that workers will have adequate food and clothing.

Anand Patwardhan, an internationally acclaimed documentary political filmmaker, released an epic documentary in 2012, Jai Bhim Comrade, on the Dalit (“untouchable”) struggles for freedom and equality.[1] (also see background information on Dalit struggle) Covering the memory of decades of struggle, Patwardhan’s fourteen-year long project and resulting film provide a rich and dense study of a socio-economic-political movement fighting against caste system with its discriminatory beliefs and atrocities. The Dalits and their comrades must confront police corruption, degenerate politics and ongoing repression. Throughout the film, the main thread of political organizing depicted comes through popular poetry, song, music, and street theater. This film explores and valorizes one of the best examples of cultural and political struggle today.

Read the complete article at EJumpCut.com.